Review of Madaari – a must watch film

Movie Review – Madaari

Any Indian critic would be lost for words after watching Madaari. Not because Irrfan Khan had surpassed his own acting capabilities, but the captivating plot along with a flawless cinematography has left everyone spellbound.

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Ritesh Shah’s script has been translated into a dramatic thriller by Nishikant Kamat (director of films like Mumbai Meri Jaan and Drishyam). That sustains the suspense of an intricate plot. Keeping aside the stunning performance of a versatile artist like Irrfan Khan. The performances of Vishesh Bansal and especially Jimmy Shergill brings forth a perfect cast carrying out their roles in a naturalistic fashion. It appeals to the aesthetic sense while disturbing the political indifference of Indians. The cities of chaos like New Delhi and Mumbai have been juxtaposed into the relative peacefulness of Rajasthan, Dehra Dun or Shimla.

Madaari is a complete trip for movie addicts who can surely get high even if they watch it along with their families. Moreover, it is an Avant-garde film which has an artistic cast that makes it one of the modern classics of Bollywood.

The much awaited cultural renaissance for which all Indians are still eagerly waiting: have been set into motion with movies like Lunchbox, Dhobi Ghaat, Gangs of Wasseypur (both parts), Gangaajal, A Wednesday, Ranjhaana, Shanghai or Maqbool. This kind of thought provoking movies has all set a trend which is evolving to its own ideological identity. Critics often complain of imitation, plagiarism or even influences (not to mention a ‘homage’), but #Madaari has left no space for criticism from that perspective.

The film is a wonderful composition which leaves a vivid impression in the minds of the audience. Madaari is a perfect theatrical thriller which keeps us thinking long. after we have forgotten amazing and innovative shots like Irrfan looking like a megalomaniac narcissist while searching for answers in a kaleidoscopic puddle where even his own reflection fails to weave him out of that tangled mess called life.

The socio-cultural references have a latent political message which is translated into art with subtle connotations of a nation corrupted with its own resources. That provide a cinematic dilemma, found in a post-colonial indigenous production like #Madaari.
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